Pegging Cameras

I’m animating a Comic-based page. It has four frames. So, as the story progresses, I move the pegged camera from one frame, to the next. Then, it needs to move to the next frame, on Cue. For some reason, it worked once, and for some reason, it will not work again. I set up a peg, and when it passes the peg, it simply reverses its movement, and goes back! I can not get it to move to one place, stay there, and then move again when I want it to. I am particularly frustrated.
-Monday

I believe you can try the following. For the peg to which your camera is attached you are moving the camera between two keyframed positions using tweening (a non-constant segment). Once you get to that second camera position you will want to switch your peg to “holds” (constant segment) until you want it to move again from its current location to a new location by tweening (a non-constant segment) again. So you can select a keyframed position and go to Element>Peg>set non-constant segment when you want tweening applied between that keyframe and the next keyframe and do the same thing except use Element>Peg>set constant segment when you want hold frames between a selected keyframe and the next keyframe.

A non constant segment is TBS termonology for applying tweening or interpolation between keyframes and a constant segment is TBS termonology for not applying any tweening or interpolation which is in fact just telling the renderer to “hold” the current keyframe until it reachs the next keyframe location on that peg. By selectively setting either constant segments or non-constant segments between specific keyframes on a peg you are basically turning on tweening or turning off tweening as desired.

In case the term tweening is not familiar to you that is just having the render interpolate (mathamatically calculate) incremental changes between frames across a sequence of frames between two defined keyframes. These interpolation calculations are controlled by the applied function curve for that keyed value for that sequence of frames. So holds are when you effectively tell the renderer to not make any calculated changes between keys. -JK

i’m not sure if you guys are talking about the same thing.

starsoft, you seem to be talking about manipulating the peg motion path in the side and/or top windows, am i right?

jk seems to be talking about the keyframes on the timeline peg and the main menu peg setting (and function editor?).

starsoft, i think the best solution would be if you tell us exactly how you did your peg action. then we’d be able to help you in a better way.
cheers,
rob

Rob, you may be correct that my explanation and his question are different.

But, pegs are pegs wheteher you view them in the time line represented as a track bar or you view them in a sceneplanning window as a divided spline curve or if you view their associated function curves in the function curve editor. They are all just different representations of aspects of using the peg.

The only track bars in the timeline that can have keyedframes associated are dynamic elements like pegs, and transforms, and the POV of the camera. The term keyframe isn’t used in TBS the way it is in Flash where any frame cell that contains content is called a keyframe. Key-frames in TBS are used just like key-frames in a non-linear editor or a compositing application. They are set on dynamic elements to control their actions. So when you have elements attached to a peg you can set keyframes and TBS interpolates in between the keyframes based on the change in parameters of those keyframes, which in Flash we call tweening. And you can use function curves to adjust the way the tweening is applied which in Flash “eight” this is called custom easing.

TBS actually has many different types of keyframes and you can have multiple keyframes associated with a single peg at a single frame. You can have motion keyframes, rotation keyframes, scaling keyframes, and skewing keyframes and each can be created independently. And each can be customized using the function curve editor for that individual type of keyframe. Each segment along a peg between two keyframes of the same type can be either constant (no interpolations) or non-constant (interpolations calculated). If a segment is non-constant then there will be a function curve that describes the way to interpolate between those two similar keys.

Now the question was asked about pegging the camera and how do you get it to “hold” its position until you want it to move to a new position. To do this I believe that you need to understand the relationships between pegs and the keyframed parameters assigned to those pegs and the way to control when and how interpolations are applied between two keyframes of the same type.

Actually I think the question really points to a desire to use TBS interactively for a comic book and the questioner will eventually decide they need to use Flash for that interactivity. But I just figured that for other readers, this was a good opportunity to discuss pegs as they apply to tweening. -JK

jk,
i am sure a peg discussion could enlighten many doubts here. and i am glad you share your big experience with us.
the topic is the method starsoft used for his work.
if he’s manipulating the peg motion path then it’s a manual operation of adjusting the camera position to the viewed objects, and it has only an indirect impact on the mathematical settings of the pegs.
that’s why i asked starsoft to describe his method.
cheers,
rob

Sorry, Rob, my mistake. Of course you are right. -JK

jk,
don’t get me wrong.
on the one side we all try to solve starsoft’s problem, on the other hand i myself was beginning to lose the plot.
i don’t know much about the pegs, either, so i thought when we ordered the possibilities in a clear sequence, starting from starsoft’s original procedure, it would have helped many other tbs users, too.
and once again, we’re all glad to have you here :slight_smile:

starsoft,
we’re waiting for your feedback. if you have solved this by yourself, any report would be great, too.
cheers,
rob

Hi Starsoft-

I got around a similar problem by having a peg attached to the camera to move from point A to B, then attached that original peg and camera to an entirely new peg for the next move from B to C and so on.

This way I could manage the each move’s timing individually in the function editor, views and on the timeline. It made each peg simpler to work with and tweak to my satisfaction in the move-pause-move-pause fashion I required for the scene, which is what I imagine you’re after to move from comic-panel to comic-panel.

Multiple moves on one peg is a headache for me to figure out. I’m just not that bright, so I do it this way.

Let us know how you get on.

Burton.

this is a very interesting idea.
so you wind up with a hierarchy of pegs, don’t you? do you attach the next peg to the original peg, or to the last one?
cheers,
rob

A hierarchy is exactly right Rob.

I connected the original peg (with camera) to a new peg. Collapse the lot in the timeline and you can connect it to another new peg. You could go on and on like that, but that poses the problem where if you go back and change that original one, the dimensions of every move thereafter might be altered? I only did two, so I’m guessing.

What’s good about it is when you expand all the peg layers in the timeline and can see when exactly each move occurs, you can slide them forward or back in time to your heart’s content to create the timing you wish.

I had to do this peg hierarchy thing when one peg made the bmp background pixels shimmer between the two camera moves I needed. A lot of hair got pulled out that day.

The idea could be good for animation and bg levels too if you’re into loops and symbols or whatever.

Cheers,

Burton.

I have been trying a different method to achieve the panning effect mentioned earlier. It uses a single camera, a motion path and some motion points:

I created a simple project containing 4 elements to which I added a box to each (increased exposure to cover 20 frames).
Each box (rectangle) was postioned to simulate a comic page panel i.e. in my example 2 rows x 2 columns.
On the timeline I added a new dynamic camera and attached this to a peg layer.
I adjusted the new camera view so that only the first box could be seen.
I then dragged the new camera across to the last box to create a motion trail.
Back on the peg layer in the timeline I was able to place 2 motion points along the motion trail.
I click-dragged the motion points in the default camera view so as to correctly place the dynamic camera FOV (switch between cameras to get the view just right).
Finally I adjusted the motion points’ tension to get straight camera movements.

The result was a panning camera view of a simulated comic page in a Z pattern (top left to top right, to bottom left to bottom right). The timing/duration can be adjusted by increasing the exposures or by moving the motion points…