Export files too big or too blurry

Hi

I am a High School teacher from Melbourne, Australia. I teach at a community school for students at risk of not completing their education.

I posted a topic already in this section, and I haven’t recieved a reply in months, so I am trying again (this time with a slightly modified question).

I am running an animation subject at my school this year and the students are using Toon Boom animation, so I would like to get this issue resolved as quickly as possible!

I have an animation file that is 1280 by 720 pixels (HD in 16:9) and I am using 25 frames per second. The animation goes for approximately 35 seconds. I am exporting the file as a .avi file. I read on this website that if you are exporting your animation files to another movie editing program (in this case Adobe Premiere CS4) that it is best not to compress the file untill later on. Thus, in the export options, I selected no compression, and 25 frames per second, with 1000s of colours. When I export the file, however, it comes out at a whopping 1.52 GB. This is too large for my computer to play without slowing down and becoming very choppy, and it makes editing the animation in Premier extremely difficult. Is a 35 second file meant to be this large?

Thus, I tried adding compression. These were the settings:

Compression: DV PAL
Quality: Best
Frame rate: 25
Scan mode: Interlaced
Aspect Ratio: 16:9

However, the animation then came out with a noticeable loss of quality… It appeared blurry.

The animation is for a TV pilot I am making, although it has direct relevance for my class as well. The TV pilot is designed for Australian television, although it will be standard def (not high def).

Do you have any suggestions for how I should be exporting these files into Premiere to avoid these problems (ridiculously massive files or blurry images)?

Thank you for your time!

-Linus

Video editing, especially in HD is very demanding on the computer…
File-sizes are usually very large… (GB’s are the norm)…

If possible, You might consider a faster computer…
Or, at least an external FireWire 800/400 Hard-drive as scratch-disk / media-drive…

You’re absolutely right, one should keep files as uncompressed as possible
until the final export from your Video-Editor … only this will ensure best quality…

Personally, I would recommend creating all new projects in HDTV 1920 x 1080…
(leaving plenty of room for exporting later to any smaller size if necessary)

If this is not possible…
Stay with your chosen format through-out your whole project… (either HD or SD)
If you choose DV-PAL…
Use both those presets in TBS (768 x 576) and Premiere (720 x 576)…
If you use DV-PAL 16:9 Anamorphic…
Use in TBS (1024 x 576) and Premiere (720 x576)
If you choose HDTV 720 (1280 x 720), use that preset in TBS and Premiere…
If you choose HDTV 1080 (1920 x 1080) use that preset…

Export from TBS as QuickTime Movie, compression: Animation…
Or export as image-sequence (PND, TIFF, PSD)…
Import those files into your Video-Editor…

Regards
Nolan

Dear Nolan. Thank you so much for your reply… I’m afraid I’m a bit of a “noob” when it comes to video editing, and I didn’t follow everything you wrote. I have listed my questions regarding the various parts of your response below. I hope that’s alright!

1. “If this is not possible…
Stay with your chosen format through-out your whole project… (either HD or SD)”

WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY “FORMAT” AND “WHOLE PROJECT”? DO YOU MEAN USE THE SAME PIXEL DIMENSIONS IN TBS AND PREMIERE?

2. “If you choose DV-PAL…”

DO YOU MEAN DV-PAL COMPRESSION?

3. “Use both those presets in TBS (768 x 576) and Premiere (720 x 576)…”

WHAT DO YOU MEAN BY “USE BOTH THOSE PRESETS” IN TBS AND PREMIERE? WHICH PRESETS? WHY WOULD YOU USE DIFFERENT PIXEL DIMENSIONS IN TBS AND PREMIERE?

4. “If you use DV-PAL 16:9 Anamorphic…
Use in TBS (1024 x 576) and Premiere (720 x576) "

WHY WOULD YOU GO FROM A 16:9 FORMAT IN TBS TO A 4:3 FORMAT IN PREMIERE? HOW DO YOU EXPORT IN “DV-PAL 16:9 ANAMORPHIC” FROM TBS?

5. "If you choose HDTV 720 (1280 x 720), use that preset in TBS and Premiere…
If you choose HDTV 1080 (1920 x 1080) use that preset…"

DO YOU MEAN USE THE SAME PIXEL DIMENSIONS IN TBS AND PREMIERE? WHY WOULD YOU USE THE SAME PIXEL DIMENSIONS IN BOTH PROGRAMS HERE, BUT NOT IN THE OTHER APPROACHES YOU LISTED ABOVE?

6. Export from TBS as QuickTime Movie, compression: Animation…
Or export as image-sequence (PND, TIFF, PSD)…
Import those files into your Video-Editor…

WHAT IS AN IMAGE SEQUENCE? HOW DO I EXPORT FROM TBS AS AN
IMAGE SEQUENCE?

Once again, thank you very much for your time! (Hope my questions weren’t too annoying!)

-Linus

  1. Applying DV-PAL in TBS is 768 x 576, because the computer works in square-pixels…
    Applying DV-PAL in Premiere is 720 x 576, because video works in non-square-pixels…
    This means, the whole project stays with the DV-PAL video standard…

    2. DV-PAL is an international standard for video-production… not a compression…

    3. Computers using square pixels… DV-PAL 4:3 = 768 x 576…
    TV / Video uses non square- or rectangular-pixels… = 720 x 576…

    4. Even it’s 720 x 576 it’s still know as “anamorphic”…
    Which means, the pixels are not square, but rectangular (non-square)…
    This applies to any Video Editor, like Premiere, Final Cut etc.
    PAL-Video is always 720 x 576, regardless it’s 16:9 or 4:3… don’t ask me why…

    In TBS choose “Custom” then type 1024 x 576…

    5. If you choose HDTV 720 (1280 x 720) or HDTV 1080 (1920 x 1080)…
    both standards are HD (High Definition), .
    They are both the same in TBS and Premiere…

    6. Exporting an image-sequence creates for every-frame in your animation a single image.
    Advantage, one can render certain frames again, one can process certain images or all
    in Photoshop or else, during a crash or outage already rendered images are not lost…
    This all is not possible, rendering to QuickTime Movie…

    In TBS go to File / Export Movie… / from the Export Format drop-down
    choose Image Sequence / from the Options choose your preferred Format
    PSD / PNG / TGA / TIFF or else…

    Regards
    Nolan

This all looks like good advice. I’m in America and the standard is NTSC however it looks like the process is the same. I didn’t think about exporting the project as an image-sequence. That sounds like the best way to go for my particular project.